• RevShirleyMurphy

How Do You Define Joy?



Joy. It’s a short but powerful word. Perhaps you can think of a moment of joy in your life? For many, it might be the moment of their marriage or the birth of a child.


At the same time, we’ve been taught and intuitively know that we define joy by more than a moment—it is more than circumstances. Happiness is dictated by circumstance. Joy is more like a deep abiding.


The word joy appears over and over again in the Scriptures. For instance, the Psalms are filled with references to joy. The psalmists write, “Weeping may tarry for the night, but joy comes with the morning” (Psalm 30:5) and “Shout for joy to God, all the earth” (Psalm 66:1). Likewise, in the New Testament, we read that joy is a fruit of the Holy Spirit (Gal. 5:22), which means that it is a Christian virtue. Given this biblical emphasis, we need to understand what joy is and pursue it.


Sometimes we struggle to grasp the biblical view of joy because of the way it is defined and described in Western culture today. In particular, we often confuse joy with happiness. In the Beatitudes (Matt. 5:3–11), according to the traditional translations, Jesus said: “Blessed are the poor in spirit.… Blessed are those who mourn.… Blessed are the meek …”, and so on. Sometimes, however, translators adopt the modern vernacular and tell us Jesus said happy rather than blessed. I always cringe a little when I see that, not because I am opposed to happiness, but because the word happy in our culture has been sentimentalised and trivialised. As a result, it connotes a certain superficiality. For example, years ago, Charles M. Schulz, in the comic strip Peanuts, coined the adage, “Happiness is a warm puppy,” and it became a maxim that articulated a sentimental, warm-and-fuzzy idea of happiness. Then there was the catchy song “Don’t Worry, Be Happy,” released by Bobby McFerrin in the 1980's. It suggested a carefree, cavalier attitude of delight.


However, the Greek word used in the Beatitudes is best translated as blessed, as it communicates not only the idea of happiness but also profound peace, comfort, stability, and great joy. So, we have to be careful when we come to the text of the New Testament that we do not read it through the lens of the popular understanding of happiness and thus lose the biblical concept of joy.


Think again about McFerrin’s song. The lyrics are very odd from a contemporary perspective. When he sings, “Don’t worry, be happy,” he is issuing an imperative, a command: “Do not be anxious. Rather, be happy.” He is setting forth a duty, not making a suggestion. However, we never think of happiness in this way. When we are unhappy, we think it is impossible to decide by an act of the will to change our feelings. We tend to think of happiness as something passive, something that happens to us and over which we have no control. It is involuntary. Yes, we desire it and want to experience it, but we are convinced that we cannot create it by an act of the will.


Oddly, McFerrin sounds very much like the New Testament when he commands his listeners to be happy. Over and over again in the pages of the New Testament, the idea of joy is communicated as an imperative, as an obligation. Based on the biblical teaching, I would go so far as to say that it is the Christian’s duty, his moral obligation, to be joyful. That means that the failure of a Christian to be joyful is a sin, that unhappiness and a lack of joy are, in a certain way, manifestations of the flesh.


Of course, there are times when we are filled with sorrow. Jesus Himself was called “a man of sorrows, and acquainted with grief ” (Isaiah 53:3). The Scriptures tell us, “It is better to go to the house of mourning than to go to the house of feasting” (Ecclesiastes 7:2). Even in the Sermon on the Mount, Jesus said, “Blessed are those who mourn, for they shall be comforted” (Matt. 5:4). Given that the Bible tells us it is perfectly legitimate to experience mourning, sorrow, and grief, these feelings are not sinful.


However, I want you to see that Jesus’ words could be translated as “Joyful are those who mourn.” How could a person be in mourning and still be joyful? Well, I think we can unravel that knot fairly easily. The heart of the New Testament concept is this: a person can have biblical joy even when he is mourning, suffering, or undergoing difficult circumstances. This is because the person’s mourning is directed toward one concern, but in that same moment, he possesses a measure of joy.


In his letter to the Philippians, the Apostle Paul speaks about joy and about the Christian’s duty to rejoice over and over again. For example, he writes, “Rejoice in the Lord always” (4:4). This is one of those biblical imperatives, and it leaves no room for not rejoicing, for Paul says Christians are to rejoice always—not sometimes, periodically, or occasionally. He then adds, “Again I will say, Rejoice” (v. 4). Paul wrote this epistle from prison, and in it he addresses very sombre matters, such as the possibility that he will be martyred, poured out as a sacrifice (2:17). Yet he tells the Philippians believers that they should rejoice despite his circumstances.


That brings us back to this matter of how we can be joyful as a matter of discipline or of the will. How is it possible to remain joyful all the time? Paul gives us the key: “Rejoice in the Lord always”. The key to the Christian’s joy is its source, which is the Lord. If Christ is in me and I am in Him, that relationship is not a sometimes experience. The Christian is always in the Lord and the Lord is always in the Christian, and that is always a reason for joy. Even if the Christian cannot rejoice in his circumstances, if he finds himself passing through pain, sorrow, or grief, he still can rejoice in Christ. We rejoice in the Lord, and since He never leaves us or forsakes us, we can rejoice always.


We can respond to life’s trials with genuine joy if we know that the Lord has a purpose for why He would allow those difficult times of suffering and trials. In James 1:2, the purpose for trials was to produce patience or endurance (the ability to hold up under a trial) in our lives.

Knowing that our loving Heavenly Father is doing something specific in our lives and that He is doing what is best for us helps us respond with genuine joy. Life’s trials are certainly not fun, but we can react to those painful situations with joy if we understand that God is demonstrating His love for us through those circumstances.


Galatians 5:22-23 gives us a list of the fruits of the spirit — and joy is listed there as one of the by products of the Holy Spirit living and abiding in us. This chapter in Galatians tells us that it is possible to “live in the Spirit” and “walk in the Spirit” (Galatians 5:16 and 25), meaning that He will naturally produce His fruit in our lives as we live for Him.


God alone can produce true joy — and He does that naturally through His Spirit living in those who have put their trust in Him. It’s important for us to understand that only God Himself can give us the ability to respond to life’s difficult circumstances with that inner contentment and satisfaction.


The old chorus Count Your Blessings by Johnson Oatman, Jr. makes the same point, “Count your many blessings, name them one by one, and it will surprise you what the Lord has done.” When we truly count or consider what God is doing, we will conclude that indeed our response should be one of joy.


It is a natural human inclination to think that living through trials and negative circumstances would not be an occasion for joy. Choosing to respond to life’s difficult situations with inner contentment and satisfaction doesn’t seem to make sense.


Yet, the believer can experience genuine joy to the fullest by taking the initiative to actively consider all that God is doing and that He has a definite purpose in mind for His people.

Sources

The Joy of the Lord - Charles Spurgeon

God Will Use This for Good (Surviving the Mess of Life) -Max Lucado

Choose Joy Women's Devotional: Finding Joy No Matter What You're Going Through - Kay Warren

https://www.ligonier.org/blog/key-christians-joy/

https://www.christianity.com/wiki/christian-terms/what-is-joy-in-christianity.html



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